Genius urges plowing to perpetuate the human species

Persecution of men’s sexuality is becoming more harsh.  The historically entrenched practice of men-on-men war threatens to engulf the world.  The cost-benefits of pornography relative to dating are stroking a dangerously solitary path.  The perpetuation of the human species is at risk.

wooden plough for medieval plowing

Opinion leaders should take a hand away from their current vigorous activities and use their head more effectively.  In medieval Europe, men had faith in reason.  Genius made a powerful, emotional appeal to men:

Plow, for God’s sake, my barons, plow, and restore your lineages.  Unless you think on plowing vigorously, there is nothing that can restore them.  … With your two hands quite bare raise the guideboards of your plows; support them stoutly with your arms and exert yourself to push in stiffly with the plowshare in the straight path, the better to sink into the furrow.

Man-degrading chivalry dominated western Europe in the thirteenth-century, just as it does in many places around the world today.  Genius recognized the original, true understanding of chivalry:

Remember your good fathers and your old mothers.  Conform your deeds to theirs, and take care that you do not degenerate.  What did they do?  Pay good heed to it.  If you consider your prowess, you see that they defended themselves so well that they have given you this existence.  If it weren’t for their chivalry, you would not be alive now.  They had great compassion for you.

Have compassion for humanity.  Throughout all of history, plowing has saved humanity from oblivion.  It’s our best hope for surviving into the future.

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Notes:

The above two quotes are from the 13th-century French masterpiece, The Romance of the Rose, about ll. 19701-15 and 1780-90, trans. Dahlberg (1995).

The image is a medieval Japanese plow.  I’ve derived the image from one available on the Japanese Wikipedia.

Reference:

Dahlberg, Charles, trans. 1995.  Guillaume de Lorris and Jean de Meun. The Romance of the Rose. 3rd ed. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.

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